Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Web Basics - TLS/SSL https

We've been looking at the basics of the internet. If you've been wondering about how it all works or are interested in web programming, you need to know the things in this series of posts.

Today's topic is TLS - Transport Layer Security. The transport layer is essentially the connection itself. The web can be divided into a model with 4 layers - two of which we've been talking about: application (HTTP) and transport (TCP and UDP). The other two are "network goo" that we really don't interact with directly. They're important, don't get me wrong, just not important to this series.

As we saw in the last post on TCP, your information is flying around the world at light speed. With the right equipment and wrongful intent, someone looking to make a buck could easily tap into your data in transit (that's what we call it when its on the move) and sell your information (usually a big batch of information) to someone who will exploit it to steal money. That is, unless its scrambled before it's sent, then unscrambled on the receiving side. Enter encryption.


Encryption



The newest big business buzz of currency - crypto-currency -  is all possible because of encryption (that's the crypto- part). It's built on the premise of uniquely encoding a "block-chain" and adding that to the existing chain to make it more valuable.

Encryption took off during WWII because radio transmissions were used by all of the militaries participating in that war. As we know, anyone can tune into radio frequencies and listen in (we can also listen to the radio transmissions of the cosmos - all the way back to the beginning of our universe!). Unless you can send a message in a way that only the receiver knows how to understand, you're toast! Every one of your moves will be known. It would be like playing chess while thinking your whole strategy out loud - you just can't win that way!

So they encoded the messages. With the messages encoded only those listeners with the decoding sequence would be able to understand. The U.S. got really good at cracking the code - which was one of the main reasons why the Allies won. Another was the perseverance and sacrifice of millions of lives of Russian soldiers. And the third was massive industrialization in the U.S. - both automated and manual industry.

History lesson aside, encryption has been used to protect privacy long before the internet. In modern times, it is used to protect data both in transit and at rest (in a database or on a hard-drive). TLS represents encryption in transit. SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) is the outdated predecessor to TLS - it's been deprecated by the authorities on internet security (the IETF*) as of June 2015.

TCP establishes a connection to communicate between two servers. TLS secures that connection by ensuring that all information transmitted through it is encrypted. The mechanisms for applying this encryption involve a certificate.

Certificates



Certificates operate on a trust basis. There are companies that issue certificates (issuer). Those companies are called certificate authorities (CA) and your computer has their root certificate pre-installed. If you are securing your server, you would purchase a certificate from one of those companies. Your URL would then be registered to that certificate. You install the certificate on your web server. When https requests are made to your server, the requester gets a copy of your certificate. Your certificate is used to establish your authenticity. It's kind of like a driver's license, passport, or other form of id.



If you are the requestor, your browser will check the certificate's signature against the signature you have on the root certificate of the issuer. The domain in the URL also has to match the domain name on the certificate you receive from the server. If there is a match, the server has been Authenticated. Once the Authenticity of the server has been established, your computer and the server will generate an encryption key for the session. All of the information shared between you and server will be encrypted and decrypted on either end using that key.

Issues

This site is not https, but it's readonly - you don't exchange any sensitive information. Be careful when you have sites that require sending sensitive info and there is no https or it is mis-configured.
This site is configured for https.


This is how most of your information is secured on the internet today - provided you and the server are using https properly. Often we see misconfigurations on servers or servers that still support unencrypted http connections (http without TLS). There are also different versions of TLS which creates more configuration issues. The best you can do is pay attention to what your browser is telling you and think a bit about what kind of information you are willing to compromise - and remember some hackers are fairly sophisticated and can piece information together from multiple sources if you are a specific target (e.g. have a lot of money or power or work for a target organization/industry).

TLS works well to protect us when configured properly, but we should still remain vigilant. It can be easy to think that https solves all of our internet security problems, but there are other ways that hackers will try to pwn you.

Continued Learning



Encryption is a vast subject in and of itself. It comes in many flavors and varieties. There are one-way and two-way hashing algorithms, asymmetric and symmetric keys, private-private and private-public keys. And it all involves some pretty intense mathematics. Crypto-masters are a rare breed but the work they do is vital to our lifeblood - secure data!


IETF - Internet Task Force



OWASP is the go-to for internet security - they have great info about TLS



Some certificate authorities along with more details are listed on WikiPedia here:


Wikipedia has a lot on the subject of TLS in general:



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