Friday, December 19, 2014

Is Better Software Your Desire?

A comment on Jim Bird's post titled "If you could only do one thing to make better software, what would it be?" on his blog Building Real Software (which has some fantastic posts and of which I am newly a fan) I made the following comment, thought I would share it here as well.

Good software should be able to change as and if the business needs change. The long-term benefits of writing software that is already decoupled, or can easily be decoupled (modular, reactive, whatever) are greater as the software can evolve at a lower cost. Good software has a lower TCO than bad software. A lower TCO can be achieved by either not changing or by changing readily. Bad software is ok as long as it doesn't need to change or isn't critical.

That being said, better software for the given situation can be achieved by connecting the developers/architects/engineers with the users and the business in a way that allows them (us) to understand the place of the software in the context in which it is intended to operate.

If you were hiring a building architect and engineers and builders to build a structure, the purpose of the structure would define the design parameters. If the building is a shelter for farm equipment, then one could likely buy an off-the-shelf structure. Conversely, if the structure is intended to house offices and strive for energy efficiency, then the project managers must find adequate resources to design and build such a building. In the latter case, the costs and time will certainly be far greater. The product should be expected to net a positive gain in the course of it's tenure at the selected location.

In software, where many parallels are made to structural architecture, it can be said that the expected cost and time should be reflected by the expected lifetime and ROI of the product. ROI can be actual profits or protected losses. These factors should drive the qualities of the code more than any other, regulatory compliance aside.

Better software can and should be driven by better project management.

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